Monday, December 3, 2012

Uruk-Hai Helmet


The Uruk-hai are an advanced breed of Orcs that serve Sauron & Saruman in the Lord of the Rings.

One day I was bored at work and wanted to work on something.  I did a google search for "cool helmets" and I found the Uruk-hai helmet.  Me being a Lord of the Rings fan I instantly knew I wanted to make this helmet, and I thought it would be fairly simple to make.  After all, they do not look like they took a long time to make in the movies......

So I'm using the 3 images below as my reference.




My helmet probably won't look exactly like this, but I think my helmet will still look pretty awesome.

I started the helmet using the featherweight method by cutting and gluing cardboard strips together.


But instead of filling the spaces in between the cardboard with more cardboard, I used some crafting foam. 


In an earlier post I successfully made an Iron Man helmet out of foam (seen here), so I know that the crafting foam in this helmet will hold up just fine.  Next I folded a piece of paper in half and drew a profile of the front of the helmet and then cut it out.


When unfolded it looks like the front of the helmet.


I used that paper as a stencil and traced the helmet onto a piece of cardboard.


I bent and cut and folded the cardboard to get the shape I wanted and then glued it onto the dome part of the helmet.


Using other pieces of cardboard, I continued the shape of the face plate to match the reference photos.


Then I took some curved pieces of cardboard and glued them to the back of the helmet to create the upwards flare in the back.


Using strips of cardboard and crafting foam, I formed the shape I wanted.


And thus the helmet comes along.


Next I cut out pieces of cardboard and bent them around to form the blades on the side of the helmet...




...and the 'tail' on the back of the helmet.


Then came the plaster wrap to the helmet, side 'blades' and the 'tail'.



Once the plaster dried I glued all the pieces together.




Then I added some extra plaster cloth around the joins.


 When the plaster dried, I applied some wood filler.


After a good amount of sanding I decided to leave it as is.  I wanted to keep the rough texture intact to give the helmet an extremely battered look.


Next I added some foam strips on the back at the base of the "tail"


...and on the front of the face plate.


Then I added some filler to the front foam strip.  These strips are to give the look of where the face plate and the tail were attached to the main part of the helmet.


Then I added some furniture tacks to the strips to make it look like they were bolted in.



I also added tacks to the side ear blades.


Then I added a foam strip down the center of the dome of the helmet and added more tacks.


Next I gave it some filler primer.



I really caked on the filler primer to fill in a lot of the holes and pits that were there from my quick wood filler application.  But even looking at these photos the texture of the helmet looks somewhat battered, which is the look I am going for, but I will need to fill in a few little areas.


After the filler was sanded and cleaned I gave the helmet another coat of primer.


When the primer dried, I gave it a layer of black acrylic paint.


I had to paint with acrylic paint as the weather is too cold to paint outdoors.  When the black paint dried I sponged on some brown paint to give the helmet the used/dirty/rusty look I wanted.


And it came out awesome.





Next I added some white paint to my hand to create Saruman's signature white hand to the helmet.  I thank my girlfriend for taking pictures of this process for me.







And it's looking even better now.



Next I added a coat of dull clear enamel to protect the helmet.


When it dried I glued in some furniture foam to make the helmet fit comfortably.


And it's all done!!!!


This was a fun project to do, and it was relatively easy to do.
Thanks for reading!!!


6 comments:

  1. Timbo, fantastic! Excellent tutorial and I'm going to have to make one of these now - soon as I get a few other projects finished...

    Keep 'em coming!

    All the best to you both.

    Phil.

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  2. Thanks Phil. Its a pretty easy build, even for some one of my amateur level. Since your good with fiberglass and bondo, yours will probably come out amazing!

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  3. Thank you so much! I'm now inspired to customise my roller derby helmet - just the top part with the foam & tacks effect and then the brown paint and hand..brilliant cheers!

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  4. I'm glad I can inspire you Chris! I would love to see how your derby helmet comes out!

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  5. Srsly amazing!!! Have you build the whole armour?

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  6. Thanks! No, I haven't built the armor....not yet anyway :)

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