Monday, May 28, 2018

The Definition of Irony and a New Table Saw

Here's a great example of Irony for you:

In my last blog entry I made a new combination table saw / Router table to replace my old table saw and router table.  This table saw worked great, but it took up a lot of space and was very heavy and hard to clean.


The new table was a smidge longer, but not as wide as the old table saw.


So I sold my old table saw in favor of this new one.  The day after I sold it I ran into problems with the new table saw.  I had played with the circular saw mounted underneath the top for several days...
  

...to get the blade alignment perfect.  But the mounting holes in the melamine board (which is particleboard covered in thin plastic) began to widen and would no longer hold the mounting screws tightly.


To fix this I drilled large holes and glued in some wood dowels for the screws to sit in.


But this didn't work either.  The screws eventually loosened again, plus the wood plugs also loosened.


So here's the Irony - the day after I sold my good table saw, my new table saw had suddenly become junk.


Since the table itself is great, and I have no problems with the router portion, I decided to buy a new sheet of melamine and replace the top.  Now in addition to being a router table, it's also holding my drill press and sander - not to mention the whole table itself is great for storage.


Since I now know melamine won't hold the screws for too long...


...I replaced the router face plate with MDF.  I know from my previous router tables that MDF will hold nicely. 


But I no longer had a table saw.  So I went out and bought one.


I bought a Ryobi table saw for a variety of reasons.  This specific one wasn't overly expensive...


...plus it can make some wide cuts that I'm used to making.  It also has a out feed stand - which is great, and the fence stays square and locks nicely.


I built a new cart for this saw, also out of melamine and 1x2 wood.  I did this to match the other table I built, plus I am discovering that white looks okay when a little dirty.  My black tool carts look rough when they are covered in saw dust (which is 99% of the time).


I have no blog entry for this new cart since it is just a rectangular box with wheels.  I added a shelf to store stuff, such as my dado blades (yes, this saw accepts dado blades).


  On the front of this new cart I placed my wood push sticks.


I took the speed square off my other table and put it on this cart...


...as well as the mount for my miter gauge.


And the sled is the same thing as the sled I had previously made, only this time I used some factory miter gauges from my previous Ryobi table saw.


A few days later I added drawers to the cart, making the cart a little heavier (which was nice) and at the same time better storing stuff.


So in the matter of 2 days I had a total of 3 table saws.  I just thought it was so ironic that once I got rid of my old table saw, my-then current table saw broke.  But that's life.

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